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The Complete Story of Texas Statehood

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This page was created after most celebrations for the 150th year of Texas Statehood were completed. Archive and reference information (and links) are added and updated as time permits. Thanks for your interest in Texas!

August 25, 1829
US President Andrew Jackson makes offer to buy Texas (later refused by the Mexican government)

July 3, 1836
Ad interim Texas President David G. Burnet calls elections for September 1, 1836

September 1, 1836
Texas voters elect Sam Houston as President and approve statehood (y-n)

October 22, 1836
First Inaugural Address of Texas President Sam Houston, Columbia, Texas
Annexation supported in address

November 18, 1836
Texas Secretary of State Stephen F. Austin certifies Texas interest in annexation

August 4, 1837
Texas annexation proposal presented to the United States (US)
Vote in US House later blocked in filibuster by John Quincy Adams (F-MA)

August 25, 1837
US Secretary of State John Forsyth notifies Texas that annexation proposal will not succeed

October 12, 1837
Texas Minister Anson Jones withdraws annexation proposal in letter to US State Department chief clerk Aaron Vail

December 10, 1838
Inaugural Address of Texas President Mirabeau B. Lamar, Houston, Texas
Annexation opposeded in address

January 23, 1839
Texas Congress ratifies President Houston’s previous withdrawal of annexation interest

December 12, 1841
Second Inaugural Address of Texas President Sam Houston, Austin, Texas

October 16, 1843
US President John Tyler, via Secretary of State Abel P. Upshur, proposes annexation to Texas minister Isaac Van Zandt

December x, 1843
US President John Tyler’s annual message to Congress includes call for immediate annexation of Texas

February 28, 1844
Steamer USS Princeton disaster
Texas annexation looses major supporters when 12-inch gun explosion kills US Secretary of State Abel P. Upshur and others

March 30, 1844
Texas annexation supporter John C. Calhoun becomes US Secretary of State

April 12, 1844
Annexation Treaty signed in Washington, DC, proposes to make Texas a US territory
US Secretary of State John C. Calhoun; Isaac Van Zandt and J. Pinckney Henderson for Texas

June 8, 1844
US Senate fails to ratify Annexation Treaty (16-35)

Summer 1844
James K. Polk selected on 9th ballot as Democratic nominee for US President, Baltimore, Maryland

Fall 1844 (no uniform election day)
James K. Polk (D-TN) elected as US President

December 9, 1844
Inaugural Address of Texas President Anson Jones, Austin
Subject of annexation not mentioned in address

February 25, 1845
US House passes Joint Resolution to offer statehood to Texas (120-98)

February 27, 1845
US Senate amends and passes Joint Resolution (27-25)
Since the office of Vice-President was vacant, it passed without a vote to spare, often incorrectly reported as having passed “by one vote”

February 28, 1845
US House concurs in Senate amendments to the Joint Resolution (132-76)

March 1, 1845
US President John Tyler signs congressional resolution offering statehood to the Republic of Texas

March 4, 1845 (Tuesday)
Inaugural Address of US President James K. Polk (D-Tennesee)
Texas annexation subject of paragraphs 21-25

March 29, 1845
Texas Secretary of State Ashbel Smith offers Preliminary Treaty to Mexico

April 15, 1845
Texas President Anson Jones issues call for a special session of the Texas Congress for June 16

May 5, 1845
Texas President Anson Jones issues call for a July 4 convention in Austin, Texas

x, 18xx
Elections held for delegates to the Convention of 1845 to convene on July 4, 1845, in Austin, Texas

May 19, 1845
Mexico signs Smith-Cuevas treaty recognizing Texas independence
Texas Secretary of State Ashbel Smith; Mexican Minister of Foreign Affairs Luis G. Cuevas

June 16, 1845
Called session of the 8th Texas Congress convenes at Washington-on-the-Brazos to consider statehood

June 19, 1845
Statehood approved by the Texas Senate (13-0) and House of Representatives (39-0)

June 21, 1845
Texas Senate rejects Smith-Cuevas treaty (0-14)

July 4, 1845
Convention delegates convene in Austin; statehood approved (55-1)

July 25, 1845
US flag first officially comes to Texas when General Zachery Taylor lands US troops from Fort Jessup (LA) on St. Joseph’s Island near later Corpus Christi

August 28, 1845
Formal approval and signing of first State Constitution
Signed by convention President T. J. Rusk, secretary James H. Raymond, and 60 delegates

October 13, 1845
Texas voters approve statehood and ratify first State Constitution

November 10, 1845
Texas certifies annexation (4254-267) and constitutional ratification (4174-312)
Certification was for only 20 of the then 36 counties

December 15, 1845
First elections held for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and Texas Legislature

December 16, 1845
US House of Representatives passes the Texas Admissions Act (141-56)

December 22, 1845
US Senate passes the Texas Admissions Act (31-14)

December 29, 1845
Texas becomes 28th state when US President James K. Polk signs the Texas Admissions Act

January 1, 1846
Texas certifies annexation (7664-430) and constitutional ratification (7527-536)
Certification now complete for 35 of the then 36 counties

February 16, 1846
First Texas Legislature convenes in Austin

February 19, 1846
Formal statehood ceremony in Austin
Farewell address of Texas President Anson Jones
Oath and inaugural address of James Pinckney Henderson (D-San Augustine) as first Governor, State of Texas

February 21, 1846
Texas State Legislature elects first Texas members to the US Senate
Sam Houston (D-Raven Hill) and T. J. Rusk (D-Nacogdoches)

March 4, 1846
Texas voters elect first Texas members to the US House
David Kaufman (D-Lowes Ferry) and Timothy Pilsbury (D-Brazoria)
Texas was divided by the Trinity River into Eastern and Western Districts

April 25, 1846
Hostilities commence on the left bank of the Rio Grande between US and Mexican military

May 2, 1846
Oath of Albert Clinton Horton as first Lieutenant Governor, State of Texas

February 2, 1848
Treaty of Guadalupe Hildaldo signed which ends the Mexican War, assures Texas statehood, and recognizes the Rio Grande as southern boundary of Texas.
For $15 million, Mexico cedes a large portion to US that later makes up all of California, Nevada, and Utah, most of Arizona and New Mexico, and parts of Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, and Wyoming.

September 9, 1850
US Congress adopts Pierce plan, Compromise of 1850, that established the current state boundry

November 25, 1850
Texas receives $10,000,000 from the United States as part of Compromise of 1850

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